zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.
The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."
"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."
Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

zerostatereflex:

Not everyone sees the same color when they stare at this spinning disk.

The gif is called, “Benham’s disk" "is named after the English toymaker Charles Benham, who in 1895 sold a top painted with the pattern shown. When the disk is spun, arcs of pale color, called Fechner colors or pattern-induced flicker colors (PIFCs), are visible at different places on the disk. Not everyone sees the same colors."

"The phenomenon originates from neural activity in the retina and spatial interactions in the primary visual cortex, which plays a role in encoding low-level image features, such as edges and spatiotemporal frequency components."

Fascinating how our brains work, I see a brown tan, what do you see? :D

(via cherripetalz)

elanorpam:

pukind:

It’s a pomesignless!
I have no idea what he’s wearing. But whatever it is, he’s getting more juice on it than his mouth.


POMESIGNLESS IS PRECIOUS AND ADORABLE EVEN IN A TINY MOBILE SCREEN

elanorpam:

pukind:

It’s a pomesignless!

I have no idea what he’s wearing. But whatever it is, he’s getting more juice on it than his mouth.

POMESIGNLESS IS PRECIOUS AND ADORABLE EVEN IN A TINY MOBILE SCREEN

(via beepony)

meowgon:

odditiesoflife:

The Most Intense Color of Any Living Thing on Earth

Also known as the marble berry, Pollia condensata is a wild plant that grows in the forests of several African countries. The berries are not edible, but they have an extremely rare property. They produce the most intense color of any living thing on Earth. Even after the berries have been picked from the plant, they stay the same shiny, vibrant, metallic blue color for many decades.

The vast majority of colors in the biological world are produced by pigments—compounds produced by a living organism that selectively absorb certain wavelengths of light, so that they appear to be the color of whichever wavelengths they reflect.

However, the marble berry’s skin has no pigment. The berries produce their vibrant blue color through nanoscale-sized cellulose strands that scatter light as they interact with one another. Thus the fruit’s color is even visible at the cellular level as pictured above.

shit i have to name a dragon after this

Oh, I just read about this!

(Source: blogs.smithsonianmag.com, via beepony)